After 7 decades, To Hoai’s 'Diary of a cricket’ still wins hearts around the world

In 1941, ‘Diary of a cricket’ was published for the first time and immediately aroused a strong interest in young readers.

To Hoai’s cricket, who began hopping on the grass along Hanoi’s To Lich River, eventually crossed national borders to touch the hearts of children in China and 40 other countries.

After 7 decades, To Hoai’s 'Diary of a cricket’ still wins hearts around the world
'Diary of a cricket’ has been translated into different languages.

To Hoai’s ‘Diary of a cricket’ has been regarded as a classic children’s novel through seven decades. It describes the adventures of a cricket in a world of animals and people, good and bad, war and peace, ideals and life’s purpose in an insightful way.

Ever since the book was written more than 70 years ago, it has been a favorite of all the children’s books in Vietnam. The story has been translated into Russian, English, French, Japanese, Swedish, Korean, and Khmer, and is popular in 40 countries.

The book was introduced to Chinese readers in January last year thanks to cooperation between China’s Solidarity Publishing House and Vietnam’s Kim Dong Publishing House. The book received a big welcome in China and has already been reprinted 3 times.

Xiao Wei, head of the Chinese Solidarity Publishing House’s Cultural Center, said, "The book has received a lot of positive comments on social networks. I think a book for children should promote values that benefit them. Through books we hope to make younger readers more compassionate and peace lovers."

The book is an encyclopedia of insects and triggers children’s curiosity about nature, while reflecting beautiful human values.

 

12-year-old Chen Jun Long from Beijing said, "The Cricket - the book’s main character - takes me on his adventure from being an arrogant cricket who likes to bully those more vulnerable than him to becoming a peace-lover who dares to protect the right things."

"I think I can learn a lot from his bravery and try not to be held back by any difficulties. The part I love most in this book is when the Cricket calls on the world to live in peace. I think this is not a message just for the insects but for people also. We need to understand that peace is something all should treasure," said Chen.

Chinese readers’ positive response to the book has paved the way for further cooperation between publishers of Vietnam and China.

"This book is evidence of fruitful cultural cooperation that benefits the youths of both countries. I hope Vietnam will introduce more interesting books, especially those for children, to Chinese readers and we can introduce more excellent Chinese books to Vietnamese readers," said Mr. Xiao Wei.

Another children’s book by To Hoai, ‘The Knight Mantis’, and a Vietnamese folk tale called ‘The Mice Wedding’ will soon be published in China.

VOV5

 
 
 
 
 
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