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Quan Chuong Gate stands the test of time

Quan Chuong Gate, the only remaining gate of the old Thang Long Citadel, holds a rustic charm despite daily changes of the capital city of Hanoi.

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Quan Chuong Gate was built in 1749 under the reign of King Le Canh Hung, and renovated in 1804 under the reign of King Gia Long. (Photo: VNA)

 

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The name of Quan Chuong, which means 'chief guard' in Vietnamese, was given by locals to honor the chief guard who led a hundred soldiers to brave French colonialists when they attacked Hanoi for the first time through this gate in 1873. (Photo: VNA)

 

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Quan Chuong gate exhibits a typical architecture of the Nguyen Dynasty. It consists of two storeys with the lower one having three arched doorways and the upper one being covered by 4 roofs decorated with a motif of hexagonal or quadrilateral asterisks. (Photo: VNA)

 

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Quan Chuong Gate, 20 metres in width and 7 metres in length, was built with stones and large-sized bricks which are similar to those used to construct the Temple of Literature. (Photo: VNA)

 

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The stone stele at the gate reflects the socio-economic situation in the most bustling trade area of the then Vietnam under the reign of the Nguyen dynasty. (Photo: VNA)

 

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Officially called as Dong Ha Gate, but Quan Chuong Gate is a preferred name. (Photo: VNA)

 

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 In 1994, the gate was officially recognized as a historic relic site. It was restored once again in 2010. For Hanoians, Quan Chuong gate is not just a relic of the ancient Thang Long capital but also a proud symbol traveling with the modern capital city. (Photo: VNA)

 

Source: VNA

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